Sunday, March 16, 2014

Remember When (Blogophlia 4.7)



No story this week.

No poem.

Maybe a rant from an aging fool.

Aristotle is quoted as saying "Happiness depends on ourselves."

What did he know, he deliberately poisoned himself to avoid treason charges.

When we were young, we were told all things were possible and then warned there would be consequences if the actually tried that. And as we grew older, we found out our elders were right. And we grow more risk adverse as more and more information comes in, all of in the form of cautionary tales of what can go wrong.

But, some of us push through the fear.  Bernie Marcus started as a Pharmacist and found out he liked the front of the store more than behind the drug counter. He pushed on and learned all he could about retailing.  Along the way, he met a thin accountant named Arthur Blank in Los Angeles. Together, they became a threat to their boss and got fired. They pushed through the fear of financial ruin and moved 2400 miles away to open a new Hardware concept store, Home Depot.

I wish I could say I pushed through the fear. I didn't. As those of you who have read me, know I worked for Bernie and Arthur for a little over three years. I could have stuck around and gotten very wealthy. But, I didn't.

I don't care. I learned I don't really care much that much for money and I don't like being the one in power. I don't like the responsibility when things go wrong. I would rather take the orders and go home to my family. 

And listen to the music. 



 

20 comments:

  1. Really? You worked for them? I think I would taken the same route you did, although it is tempting to know what would have happened otherwise. :)

    -Leta

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    1. Yep. I was there from 1980-1983. When I started there were 4 store and 18 people in the central office. When I left there were 28 store open, with 18 more due to open in the next 5 months and 120 people in the office. I wouldn't trade the experience for anything, but I was completely exhausted at the end.

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  2. In my world it was my absolute no to living in Manhattan. I might have made there I was close to good enough - but you can't make if you refuse to go

    A lot of choices I made were "anti-money" I was happy with all of them until the tuition bills began. Even now I think I'd still make them.

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    1. Yeah, my Dad had the same opinion of New York. He turned down several opportunities there.

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  3. I'm with you, I wouldn't like all that responsibility.

    Irene

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    1. The couple of times I was a supervisor or manager, I was miserable. I really was.

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  4. You've got your priorities straight

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  5. Usually I find that businesses start off with a dream and a lot hard work and determination. It's gamble but sometimes you've got to try.

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    1. Absolutely. And when I was in my 20's, I had some of that fire. I think part of it was parental approval seeking, but I sketched several business plans and never followed through.

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  6. You chose wisely....I love that line!

    8 points Earthling! :)

    Marvin

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  7. That's pretty amazing that you worked for these guys! Way cool.

    I can relate.... being the Director of HR is a real challenge, even in a small non-profit. The "fun" just never ends! *groan* Sometimes I'd rather just crank out spreadsheets all day, go home and forget about everything. :/

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  8. You can't always assume that someone else will keep you around. So it is best to leave on your own terms. And be at peace with it. -David II

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    1. True. There have been many times I should have been fired and just left.

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  9. So very wise and wonderfully empowering. I love it!

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  10. Rants can often be a good thing.
    a person cannot be at peace with himself if he is not comfortable with what he does. I often think that my choices 40 years ago were not made wisely and choosing the elusive dollar did not reap the rewards in either the monetary or emotional levels expected. If fact they fell far short... Oh well there is always the next life! :)

    Blue fool

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    1. It's hard to make the wise choice when we are young. We think we know it all and we get proven wrong constantly.

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  11. Money isn't everything!!! I have to learn that from a poor person's standpoint but it is so true..can't buy happiness.

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